37% of employees using social media w/o IT permission

We make money or save money by providing value to others in a cost effective manner.  Pretty simple, really.  Technology can streamline the process and make us more efficient at a lower price point — but just as easily technology can be a massive time waster that actually costs us money.

Think of all those apps on Android and the iPhone that are games like Zombie Farm.     Loads of fun, but not exactly productivity enhancers!

Which brings me to a recent blog on the Harvard site.   The article discusses a study by Harvard which shows that employees are using social media including mobile technologies and video to improve how they do their jobs.  These employees are solving your customer and business problems without permission from the information technology (IT) departments:

“In a survey of more than 4,000 U.S. information workers, we found that 37% are using do-it-yourself technologies without IT’s permission. LinkedIn, Google Docs, Smartsheet.com, Facebook, iPads, YouTube, Dropbox, Flipboard — the list is long and growing.”

Forrester Research even gives this trend a name:  Technology Populism.

In a sense all this end user “power” is a good thing — people are not waiting for IT to solve problems.  Technology like Facebook and other social media proves that if companies don’t take advantage of new technologies then customers WILL and this is not always good for companies.   Many a corporation has been blind sided by consumers angry at faulty equipment or mishandled customer “service.”

Yet picture a large company with employees each “doing their own thing” technologically speaking.  Fairly soon will we not have misinformation from our own employees with videos on YouTube giving out erroneous “facts”?   Will we have “stuff everywhere” and a common corporate value proposition (aka the corporate position) totally destroyed and misinterpreted by people who only see part of the picture?

I am reminded of the story of the blind men and the elephant.   In this parable by Sufi Jalaluddin Rumi we are told that a group of blind men touch an elephant  and then must describe the elephant. Each man feels a different part, but only one part and the result that no one describes the elephant as a whole, but each describes the animal differently based on one piece.  One describes an elephant as long and thick like a boa constrictor — he feels the trunk.  Another describes the elephant as long and skinny — he is describing the tail.  Another says the elephant is flat like a stingray — he describes the ear, and so forth.

If our employees are using social media and other technologies to help “describe” our companies and our products / services are they knowledgeable enough of the whole —  the goals and true strengths — to be helping the corporation, or is there wholesale chaos as each is so focused on one small part that they miss the elephant for the tail?

True enough there is no way to put the genie back in the bottle.  Technology, particularly “Web 2.0” with smart phones and social media is here and will be part of our future if we deal with it or ignore it.   Should we allow our employees to go off willy nilly and be empowered to “do their own thing” or should we try to build some rules around this wild west of technology?   My contention is that in the end we will all meet somewhere in the middle.  We cannot truly control all of our employees any more than we can control our customers (or our children).  Yet, we must put some structure into place or we will face wholesale anarchy.  Welcome to the new, brave new, world of technology.

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About Sandra Eisenberg

Dynamic pragmatic marketing and sales executive whose biggest asset is converting technology to real corporate value -- for a variety of industries including health care providers (Adventist Health System Sunbelt), Teradata (Data Warehousing), RWD Technologies (quality improvement and professional services), Siemens and AT&T (telecom). Sandra brings twenty years of experience in sales, marketing and IT management. Her career spans entrepreneurial firms (E5 Marketing) and senior positions in sales, sales management (direct and indirect), marketing, channel development and product management at Bell Labs and NCR Teradata. A few career highlights: • Total product lifecycle management (PLM) using ISO 9001 and other quality methodologies. Sunset aging product lines and developed a migration path to a new, open standards platforms at Avaya, NCR and Bell Labs. • 1st woman to win the AT&T and NCR Teradata national sales awards -- top sales manager and sales rep at AT&T, NCR Teradata and Avaya • Delivered profitable marketing campaigns in the area of CRM, Business intelligence, contact centers and other high tech areas • Run call centers, sold call centers and been in product management of call centers (Avaya, AT&T and NCR) • Director of CRM Strategic Planning and Alliances at Avaya and NCR Teradata • Senior Manager of Product Management Bell Labs (business intelligence, data warehousing and CRM) Most recently Sandra managed the Central Florida territory for Siemens' telephony division. Siemens is selling this division soon and their loss can be your gain.

Posted on September 5, 2010, in CMR, CRM, Facebook, internet, internet marketing, Marketing, mobile, SMM, social media, social media marketing, viral marketing, YouTube. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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